Mineral Family: Tectosilicate

Chemical Composition: SiO2
Cleavage: None
Color: All colors
Crystal System: Hexagonal/trigonal
Form/Habit: Massive
Fracture: Conchoidal
Gravity:  2.65-2.69
Hardness: 7
Luminescence: Reddish
Luster: Aventurescent, Viterous
Streak: White
Transparency: Translucent, opaque

Where does Aventurine come from?

Aventurine Placeholder
Aventurine

Almost all Aventurine on the market comes from Canada and India

What is Aventurine?

Aventurine is a type of Quartz, which is in turn a Silicate mineral. Silicate minerals form the largest family of minerals, including more than 25% of all known minerals and 40% of all common minerals. In addition to being a major part of the Earth’s crust, Silicate minerals have also been found on the moon and in meteorites. Silicates are minerals which contain the elements Silicon (a light gray shiny metal) and Oxygen (a colorless gas). Together, these two elements form a tetrahedron – a shape similar to a pyramid – with a Silicon atom in the center and Oxygen atoms at each of the four corners. These tetrahedra connect with other chemical structures, in six different ways, to form various minerals and rocks. There are six main groups of Silicate minerals, and these main groups are further subdivided into secondary subdivisions, such as Quartz and Feldspar. Quartz is a large mineral family in its own right, and has two main subdivisions, macrocrystalline (crystals that are large enough to be seen by the naked eye, for example, Amethyst) and microcrystalline (crystals so small they can only be seen through a microscope, for example, Agate). Aventurine is one of these macrocrystalline Quartzes. It is most commonly green, but may also be blue, orange, pink, red, white, or yellow.

How is Aventurine formed?

Aventurine is created when liquid magma from a volcanic explosion cools down and transforms into igneous rock. During this cooling down period, silica acid bubbles shift from being a gas/liquid into a solid compound. The bubble becomes a hollow space in the igneous rock and the silica acid becomes Quartz crystals. Trace particles of Iron and Fuchsite (chromium mica) within the silica acid gives Green Aventurine its color and sparkle.

How is Aventurine mined?

Typically mined from the primary deposits which still have their original relationship with the host rock. They are typically found as companion stones in commercial mines for various colored Quartzes, Calcite, and other gemstones.

Is Aventurine natural?

All Aventurines are natural, enhanced only through cutting and polishing.  “Goldstone” has a similar sparkly appearance, but is a manmade glass.