History of Aventurine

All colors of Aventurine may be considered relatively “new” healing stones whose properties have only recently begun to be explored. Aventurine was not included as a distinct mineral in most early lapidaries, texts which describe gemstones and their powers.  According to one modern lapidary, ancient Tibetan statues were often decorated with Aventurine, particularly for the eyes. Supposedly, this was to symbolically increase the statue’s visionary powers. The one thing we absolutely know about the history of Aventurine is how it got its name. It comes from the Italian a ventura, meaning “by chance.” The name actually refers to the 18th century discovery of Goldstone, a man-made sparkly glass, which is usually golden-orange or blue-purple. Goldstone has a distinctive sparkle. Natural Aventurine also sparkles, although less uniformly.

Multicolor Glitter Background, Rainbow Colors, Diagonal Stripes

One of the ways that geologists identify stones is by their luster, or how light reflects off a stone. For example, Quartz has a Vitreous (like glass) luster, while Hematite has a Metallic luster, and Jade has a Waxy luster. A few stones have very special lusters, like Tiger’s Eye chatoyancy luster with is luminous moving bands and Labradorite’s iridescent luster (schiller effect) with its bright flashing colors.  Another special luster is “aventurescent” – the official term for stones that glitter. Only two natural gemstones have this quality, Aventurine and Sunstone.