Published June 2014  •  Updated June 2022  •  Read Time: 7 minutes
Chrysocolla is a beautiful blue and green crystal that grows near Copper.  It ranges in shade from bright sky-blue to deep emerald green and often has a mixture of different shades.  It is often found intergrown with other copper-derived minerals such as dark blue Azurite and green Malachite.  Chrysocolla was beloved by royalty in the ancient world.  It helped make King Solomon richer and Queen Cleopatra more alluring.  It has been called a stone of wisdom for thousands of years.  Today, Chrysocolla is a stone of peace and healthy communication.  Its energy can help us create sanctuaries where everyone feels safe and deep healing is possible.

Blue Chrysocolla

Chrysocolla Meaning

Spiritual Healing Properties

Chrysocolla empowers feminine energies and is a stone of the Goddess. It brings gifts of balance and serenity so that we can communicate with the spiritual energies of Mother Earth herself. It provides a deeply grounding energy that feels safe and strong, and allows us to live from a place of very real love and to communicate that love accordingly. When placed in the home or other space, its energy transmutes negativity and fear, and creates a cozy sanctuary for daily living and spiritual exploration. Chrysocolla is also a valuable tool for anyone engaged in sound healing, whether through talking, music, or sound vibration.

Metaphysical Properties Chrysocolla
Chakra Root, Heart and Throat
Element Water
Numerology 5
Zodiac Taurus, Gemini and Virgo

Emotional Healing Properties

Chrysocolla is a very soothing stone for the emotional body. It releases negative emotions and asks us to take ownership of our own lives. It reminds us that our own experiences, knowledge, and contributions are vitally important, and that we must properly value ourselves and claim our rightful self-confidence. Chrysocolla encourages us to show our true selves to the world, without fear or masks, allowing us to share our own deep wisdom and consciously give good energy to the world. Chrysocolla is also an excellent stone to help heal and strengthen relationships which have been shaken by stressful situations, and can help us return to healthy and loving interactions.

Mental Healing Properties

Chrysocolla helps us to keep a cool and calm head, particularly during negotiations and other important discussions. It reminds us to stay focused on our primary aim and to be willing to concede points and compromise as necessary in order to get our own needs and desires met. Chrysocolla urges us to strive for win-win solutions and promotes peaceful and loving communication. It can also help us to stay neutral when we are facilitating conversations between two opposing groups. Chrysocolla is one of the very best stones for communication, helping us to know when to speak and what to say, as well as when to be silent. It is an excellent stone for teachers, politicians, public speakers, singers, writers, and anyone else who relies on words for their living. Chrysocolla is also a wonderful talisman for doctors, nurses, healers and other healthcare professionals to help accurately diagnosis and treat patients, and to cultivate a soothing bedside manner.

Physical Healing Properties

Chrysocolla is recommended when we need to physically and mentally calm down. It encourages us to pause for a moment and concentrate on our breathing, taking deep breaths and allowing ourselves to relax. Chrysocolla can help us recognize what is happening inside our body when we are stressed. Instead of simply believing our thoughts and emotions, Chrysocolla teaches us to pay attention to chemicals like cortisol and adrenalin or estrogen and progesterone, as well as high blood pressure and low blood sugar. It reminds us that these natural physical reactions not only affect our body but can compound anxious thoughts and start a negative chain-reaction. When we recognize what is happening on a physical level, it is much easier to take sensible action to comfort and sooth ourselves. Chrysocolla is also a beautiful talisman to hold when we are dealing with any problems that affect the lungs, throat, larynx or thyroid.

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Chrysocolla Mineralogy

Where does Chrysocolla come from?

Chrysocolla deposits are located in Australia, Britain, Chile, Congo, Israel, Mexico, Morocco, Peru, Russia, United States (Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah), and Zaire.

Mining and Treatments

Chrysocolla is mined at its primary location inside commercial Copper mines. It is typically found as rounded nodules and in veins.

All Chrysocollas are natural, enhanced only by tumbling, cutting, and polishing. Because some varieties have more commercial value than others, buyers are cautioned to check the mine origins carefully when purchasing more rare varieties such as Eilat Stone/King Solomon’s Stone.

Chrysocolla Placeholder
Chrysocolla

Mineral Family

Chrysocolla is a phyllosilicate mineral. Silicates are minerals which contain the elements Silicon (a light gray shiny metal) and Oxygen (a colorless gas). Together, these two elements form a tetrahedron – a shape similar to a pyramid – with a Silicon atom in the center and Oxygen atoms at each of the four corners. These tetrahedra connect with other chemical structures, in six different ways, to form various minerals and rocks. There are six main groups of Silicate minerals, and these main groups are further subdivided into secondary subdivisions, such as Quartz and Feldspar. Chrysocolla belongs to the phyllosilicate group, whose tetrahedra connect at three corners to form hexagonal rings.

Chrysocolla’s energy works well with its family – other phyllosilicate minerals.  Try it in combination with Apophyllite, Cavansite, Fuchsite, Kammererite, Lepidolite, Muscovite, Petalite, Prehnite, Seraphinite, and Serpentine

Chrysocolla Formation and Crystal Associates

Chrysocolla is formed in the oxidation zone of Copper ore mines when surface water containing silicic acid dissolves Copper out of the rock. On rare occasions it forms crystals, but the majority of the time it is fine-grained and massive.

Chrysocolla’s energy works well with its “friends” – crystal associates formed in the same geological environment.  Try it in combination with Azurite, Dioptase, Malachite, Shattuckite

Mineralogy Chrysocolla
Chemical Formula Cu2H2(Si2O5)(OH)4 nH2O
Cleavage None
Color Blue, Green, Blue-green
Crystal System Orthorhombic
Form/Habit Massive
Fracture Uneven to brittle
Hardness – Mohs Scale 2-4
Luminescence None
Luster Vitreous
Mineral Family Phyllosilicates
Specific Gravity 2-2.4
Streak Pale blue, tan, and grey
Transparency Opaque

History of Chrysocolla

Chrysocolla has a long and celebrated historical tradition, despite the fact that for most of its history it was seen as a multi-colored Turquoise or semi-precious gem rock rather than a mineral in its own right. Chrysocolla is mentioned in the majority of ancient lapidaries, texts which describe gemstones and their powers. Civilizations worldwide have frequently celebrated Chrysocolla as a stone for harmony, peace, strength, and communication.

The most famous historical Chrysocolla deposit was located in the Levant. In 1000 BCE, King Solomon of Israel was said to have owned fabulous Copper mines in southern Israel and Africa, which also produced a beautiful blue-green stone, called the Stone of King Solomon or Eilat Stone, whose name is derived from the city of Eilat, the largest city in southern Israel. This stone was a combination of Chrysocolla, Malachite, and Turquoise.

In modern Israel, Eilat Stone is the national gemstone and is sold widely to tourists. However, the fabled mines played out long ago, and so the vast majority of the stones being sold to tourists are actually imported from Morocco and the United States! Archaeologists in Israel are currently excavating a large ancient Copper mine, which many believe to have been the fabled King Solomon’s mines.

The name Chrysocolla was first used in 315 BCE by Theophrastus, the Greek philosopher, scientist and successor of Aristotle. His treatise, On Stones, was one of the primary sources used by virtually every lapidary that came afterwords. Unlike most lapidaries, On Stones was more of a geology and mineralogy text, rather than a metaphysical one. While he included a few myths and legends, most of the book divides stones and minerals according to their physical properties. Chrysocolla’s name comes from the Greek words chrysos meaning “gold” and kola meaning “glue.” That name references the fact that Chrysocolla was used in ancient times as an ingredient for solder, used to weld gold pieces together. Chrysocolla was later used during the Renaissance to make a blue pigment for paint.

Chrysocolla’s metaphysical properties date back to ancient Egypt, where it was known as the “wise stone” and carried by diplomats whose job was to negotiate, find compromises, and ensure favorable resolutions. Pharaoh-Queen Cleopatra (69-30 BCE) likewise wore Chrysocolla jewelry whenever she met with foreign ambassadors and rulers. However, not everyone was influenced by the wise energy of Chrysocolla. The self-absorbed and opulent Emperor Nero of Rome (37-68) ordered green Chrysocolla dust to be spread across the floor of the Colosseum whenever he raced as a charioteer. Green was Nero’s favorite color and the symbol for the faction that was most loyal to him.

Chrysocolla is widely found in the American Southwest and Mexico. Indigenous peoples have believed for centuries that Chrysocolla brings strength to the body and soothes the emotions. Chrysocolla is rarely found in its pure form, and instead usually is part of fantastic combination stones. For example, Apache Chrysocolla is actually a beautiful combination of Chrysocolla, Lapis, Malachite, Quartz, and Red Jasper.