History of Fluorite

Fluorite comes in every shade of the rainbow, and has only been recognized as a distinct mineral since the eighteenth century, making it difficult to establish any ancient and medieval healing traditions. While it is not clearly included in ancient and medieval lapidaries, Fluorite is listed in virtually all modern lapidaries.  Some of these lapidaries simply list Fluorite as a single stone, while others include passages for each distinct color.

For most of its history, Fluorite was lumped in with other stones that easily break, such as Calcite, or with stones that help ore reach its melting point more quickly. The name Fluorite comes from the Latin fluere, meaning “to flow.” This is a reference to how easily Fluorite melts when exposed to hot temperatures. Since Fluorite is often found with valuable metals, such as Silver, it is often seen in its liquid form during the smelting process used to refine metals. In 1852, Fluorite was responsible for first demonstrating the phenomenon of fluorescence  – a bright glow that some objects emit when exposed to ultraviolet light (black light). It was at this point that Fluorite was recognized as a distinct mineral, and it immediately became a favorite stone for natural history museums and collectors of all sorts.

Fluorescent Minerals

Fluorescent minerals under UV light