History of Moonstone

Moonstone has been a prized gemstone for centuries. Unlike most healing stones, Moonstone isn’t a single mineral or a rock, but rather the title given to a variety of Feldspars that show a shimmering iridescence. Most Moonstones are white or cream colored, but they can also be peach or black.  Moonstone has been closely associated with the moon since antiquity.

The oldest historical reference to Moonstone comes from Pliny the Elder (CE 23-79), a Roman author, naturalist, and philosopher. In his lapidary, The Natural History of Precious Gemstones, Pliny the Elder wrote that Moonstone, “contain[s] the image of the moon, which, if the story are true, daily waxes and wanes according to the state of the luminary.” The idea that Moonstones would change in size and luster according to the phases of the moon was repeated in numerous other ancient and medieval lapidaries. In the 16th century, this legend was even “proven” by Antoine Mizuald, an Italian scientist who studied a Moonstone owned by Pope Leo X (1475-1521). According to Mizuald, he carefully recorded the changing size and the position of the shimmer on the gemstone and compared them to the moon in the sky. His research led him to conclude that there was in fact a direct correspondence between the gemstone and the lunar orb.

Because Moonstone has long been tied to the moon and lunar cycles, it is no surprise that Moonstone is often considered a particularly powerful talisman for women and feminine energies. It has long been associated with soothing menstrual discomfort, enhancing fertility, and easing the pains of childbirth.  Rainbow Moonstone and Peach Moonstone are associated with the full moon and crescent moon.  Black Moonstone is associated with the dark moon.   and connects us with the Dark Goddess, queen of Witches and the Sacred Mysteries.

Moon Mother

Moon Mother